Tag Archives: album review

Album Review | Hellogoodbye – ‘Would it kill you?’

Review: Sibel Kutlucan
Hallelujah! Hellogoodbye have praised us with their return to the music world with the extremely dandy new release of their full length album Would It Kill You? An 11 track album that filled the void of the four years without a full length release from the Californian boys, since their release of Zombies! Aliens! Vampires! Dinosaurs! (released 2006). Would It Kill You? is truly an evolution for the band, maturing greatly from their previously dominant indie-synth and power pop sound; now embracing the indie pop rock sound that is ruling the music scene at the moment. The metamorphosis is extraordinary and definitely has done great things for the album and Hellogoodbye who have come a long way since their disco-esque electronics and syntehsised vocals on older tracks such as Shimmy Shimmy Quarter Turn.
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Colin Hay – “Gathering Mercury” – Album Review

Review by: Ben Connolly

There’s a warmth to Colin Hay’s vocals which instantly resonates. There’s no confusion as to what’s to be expected when an acoustic guitar and that Scottish-via-Sydney vocal kicks in. Like others of his ilk – namely Robert Forster, Paul Kelly and to a lessor extent The Church’s Steve Kilbey – his peculiar brand of Australian-ness swells the heart and instantly proves to be a soothing salve.

Suffering from an abundance of talent by a fairly lackadaisical approach to career direction, Hay’s name seems to have dropped out of the contemporary consciousness. Save for the odd appearance on an American sitcom (he seems to be the darling of the US medical satire Scrubs) and a recent legal stoush thanks to an opportunistic claim for copyright infringement, Hay has been relatively out of the public eye since the 1985 implosion of Men at Work.
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Marianne Faithfull – “Horses and High Heels” – Album Review

Review: Victoria Nugent
I was a little disappointed when I discovered Marianne Faithfull’s latest album Horses and High Heels consisted mainly of covers. The folk singer better known as a former lover of Mick Jagger during the heyday of the Rolling Stones has over thirty years of singing experience, and I was rather hoping to hear a full body of original songs rather than the mere four present on her 23rd solo album.

Nevertheless Faithfull has gathered a stellar group of supporting artists such as Lou Reed and Dr John to flesh out the album, turning her hand to songs from across a wide range of genres and styles. Produced again by Hal Willner and recorded in the New Orleans French Quarter, the album makes use of New Orleans musicians in the band.
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CD Review | Pushking – “The World As We Love It”

Review: Sibel Kutlucan

Pushking’s new album, “The World As We Love It” certainly isn’t for the faint-hearted! The album packs a punch with 19 tracks selected from an extensive back catalogue, and featuring a smorgasbord of rock legends, from Paul Stanley, Alice Cooper and Steve Vai (just to name a few!) For these amazing names alone The World As We Love It is worth a listen, however, Pushking definitely hold their own ground and prove their recognition as amazing European power-metal rockers that can’t help but throw you back in time to huge hair, and shiny leather pants.
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Album Review | The Bloodpoets – ‘Wings’

Review: Sibel Kutlucan

The Bloodpoets, indie rockers hailing from Brisbane have continued their infectious streak with their new EP ‘Wings’.
Wings teases the listener with 6 tracks, each as unique as the other, broadcasting the diversity of the Bloodpoets style. It is great to hear real instruments amongst so much of the heavily synthesised and edited muck that is disguising itself as music nowadays. The Bloodpoets aren’t afraid to showcase their talents and diverse tastes; from trombones, trumpets and saxophones on “Sunny Day”-an amazing jazzy number, to violin and the melodic combination of male and female vocals with band’s Tom Murphy and Bec Plath complimenting one another on “She Feels It” –the definite favourite for me.
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Album Review | Heroes For Hire – ‘Take One For The Team’

Review: Sibel Kutlucan
Take One For The Team, the second full-length album from Sydney pop punk act Heroes For Hire definitely has a strong pop punk sound that plants them on the same page of any well known Fueled by Ramen band.

When I first heard the intro of track 1, “No Milk Will Ever Be Our Milk”, I was flooded with memories of being 14 and bouncing around to Simple Plan and Fall Out Boy in my bedroom. For those who don’t favour the whiny vocals and energetic drumming and guitar riffs reminiscent of bands like Blink 182 and Sum 41, then this definitely isn’t an album for you.
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Duff McKagan’s Loaded – “The Taking” – Album Review

Review by: Ben Connolly
Musical legacies are fickle beasts. For the privileged few, early bravado can lead to a lifetime of open doors and opportunities; for most, thorough, their own massive shoes are rarely filled again, leaving a life of painfully striving either to attain the same heights, or failing to convince the world that there’s more to give. For those at the pinnacle, the ones whose exploits drew a definite line with which others would measure themselves, this is arguably even more acute: audiences are liable to bay for more brilliance, and are vocally deflated when their lofty expectations are not met (take, for example, the expectation of larger-than-myth Bob Dylan, whose audience is rudimentary brought down to earth every time his never-ending tour juggernaut rolls through town).
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My Own Pet Radio – Unidentified Flying Collection of Songs [Album Review]

Review by: Lauren Sherritt

Unidentified Flying Collection of Songs is the first album released by My Own Pet Radio, the name under which Brisbane artist Sam Cromack works solo. The bedroom recorded, experimental album is a solid example of decent, hard worked music created by a passionate and hard working musician.

Cromack, also known as the front man for indie rock/pop band Ball Park Music, really goes to town on the album cutting samples, employing effects and layering instruments, all played by himself, with intricate and distinct lyrics. The songs collectively move through various styles, bluesy influences sitting alongside poppy rock and folksy, lilting acoustic pieces. Carefully crafted to fit together as a whole album, the spectrum of styles in the songs speaks of the years of work gone into developing Cromack’s skill, and the album transcends the hyped world of sale figures and radio play stats to sit as a thought provoking piece of artwork.
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The Go! Team – Rolling Blackouts [Album Review]

Review By Helen Brown


Rolling Blackouts (Bonus Track Version) - The Go! TeamRolling Blackouts (Bonus Track Version)
  Rolling Blackouts, the third release from British band The Go! Team, can be best described as a breath of fresh, salty sea air. The tracks are energetic and empowering, the kind of album you would take with you on a short road trip adventure. The Go! Team exhibit undertones of Regurgitator’s electronica phase, circa 1997 to 1999.

Their first song, ‘T.O.R.N.A.D.O.,’ is a hip hop-laced number about moving your body to the beat. It is punchy right from the start with no soft introduction to ease you in. The tracks ‘Secretary Song’ and ‘Bust-Out-Brigade’, sound very much like theme songs from sitcoms and crime shows with the use of cheerful clap-along beats and synthesised siren sounds respectively.

The vibe throughout the album is generally to be happy within yourself, enjoy life and have fun with the people around you.
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IGGY POP & JAMES WILLIAMSON – KILL CITY (2010 REMIX) – Album Review

By Maria Bailey
The year was 1975. The Stooges had split and Iggy Pop was at his worst. No record contract, depressed, suicidal and smacked of his tits on heroin. He spent most of his time confined within a mental home battling his demons and trying to get some sort of normality back into his famously abnormal life. Good medicine arrived when former Stooges guitarist James Williamson proposed the idea for a demo album to help get Iggy’s legendry vocals back into the studio, back on the radio and back within the hearts of punk rockers across the world. Two years passed and in 1977 former Stooges front-man teamed with musical genius David Bowie to produce Iggy’s first solo records “The Idiot” and “Lust for Life.” Riding on their success, Kill City finally found recognition from Los Angeles based label Bomp! Records.
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Gareth Liddiard “Strange Tourist” Album Review

Review: Ben Connolly

  It’s an almost shameful admission, but I just didn’t get into The Drones. I don’t know why; their mix of growling guitars, flat-tonal Australian vocals and aggressive, charged lyrics ticked all the boxes for qualities I generally seek out in bands to obsess over. I guess by the time I’d cottoned on to their charms, however, the boat had well and truly sailed and was now somewhat overburdened by eager fan-boys keen to wring the band’s name out for as much street cred as possible. Truth be told, the fan-boy’s fervour (and the self-assured scoff of the object of their adoration) scared me just a little. That said, The Drones’cover of Kevin Carmody’s River Of Tears at

the Cannot Buy My Soul gig remains one of my highlights of recent years (check the clip out on Youtube if you’ve never seen it).
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John Legend featuring The Roots “Wake Up” – Album Review

Review: Jose Eduardo Cruz
One of the most powerful mediums to communicate the general condition of your immediate world is art. Art takes on different forms and its success will ultimately be determined by its public appeal or lack thereof. Art layered with social commentary has the ability to influence public opinion. For example, the Hope stencil piece created during the Obama presidential campaign in 2008.

African American history shows that black artists have had the ability to create transcendent music inspired by their surroundings and relevant political climate. Such music was prevalent during the 60’s and 70’s in response to the civil rights movement and Vietnam War respectively.
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Rocketsmiths “The Bones” – Album Review

Review: Victoria Nugent

  The Bones by Brisbane band The Rocketsmiths is relentlessly, unashamedly rock with edgy guitars, and taut vocals by the bucket load. These guys have been described as vaudevillian rock, and there’s a definite hint at the weird and wacky in their songs.

The first track of the album is Monster Part 1, which features some dark riffs, a catchy beat, wailing vocals, and great dynamics, switching from loud to soft throughout the song.

This song is followed up with a later track on the album called “Monster Parts 2 &3”, and starts off with eerie organ, echoing vocals and a tempo that steadily gets faster, before breaking into edgy riffs and screaming vocals.
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The Magic Numbers “The Runaway” – Album Review

Review: Natalie Salvo

  They say you can pick your friends but you can’t choose your family, so where does that leave a group like The Magic Numbers? The band is made of two lots of brother and sister pairings (Sean & Angela Gannon and Romeo & Michele Stodart for those playing along). They first entered the limelight back in 2005 when they released a successful eponymous debut. The following year would see “Those The Brokes” dropped with breakneck speed but it would also cause the group friction, both familial and otherwise. Now at album number three, “The Runaway”, the quartet initially had to take some time out (read: pursue side projects and make guest appearances) before they could regroup refreshed and ready.

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The Drums “The Drums” – EP Review

Review: Natalie Salvo
The Drums are a young band from New York City who – like The Strokes before them – received a lot of hype very early on. But as their debut EP, Summertime! And now eponymous debut album have proved, this indie pop quartet are more about basking in the sunlit glow of a California beach than being inspired by yellow cabs or shopping on fifth avenue.

The guys ooze retro cool and like Peter Hook’s bass playing in Joy Division and New Order, their sound makes an immediate impact gaining your attention quickly with its old-yet-fresh style. But it seems this quality is also the group’s pitfall because when spread out over 12 songs, it becomes too repetitively simple and the buzz does tend to wear off a little. Like summer itself, you miss it when it’s gone but after enough humid 40+ degree days you can’t wait for winter or at the very least, autumn.
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